High Park Labyrinth – Hawk Hill

High Park Labyrinth -- Hawk Hill

The Labyrinth Community Network is best known for their efforts in animating the green space in Trinity Square Park with The Toronto Public Labyrinth.

The LCN is less known for their first success, The High Park Labyrinth. It was initiated in 2001 by Sylvia Senensky.

Located in the secluded dip just north of Hawk Hill, The High Park Labyrinth has been enjoyed by those in the know for years.

Those who don’t know are usually patrons of the Grenadier Cafe and Tea House or people parking their cars in the lot just a stone’s throw away.

High Park Labyrinth -- A Special Place (Information Sign)Originally, the labyrinth was in an area of High Park going through a period of regeneration.

An agreement was reached between Parks and Recreation people and LCN members. The Labyrinth could be located inside the giant circle, itself inside of a double circle of picnic benches. The inner circle of tables were removed allowing for a wider diameter.

The deal was that the High Park Labyrinth would be allowed, but the Labyrinth Community Network could not publicize the fact it was there. People would have to discover it on their own.

Today, it has become well known, with an official City of Toronto sign.

Eduardo Sousa, one of the LCN’s founding members, and a friend, eventually broke down and told me of its existence some years ago.

Owing to its origins within an area then going through natural regeneration, The High Park Labyrinth has itself twice been regenerated by being repainted. First in 2004 and again in 2008.

In 2004 it was repainted by Sylvia and friends. Sylvia has since moved out west to British Columbia.

Separately, Eduardo Sousa also now calls Vancouver, British Columbia Home.

In 2008, Anny Fyreagle was walking it and noticed the High Park Labyrinth was fading away.  Anny received the go ahead from Parks & Recreation to repaint it.  With help from Gloria Worth and Susan Rapley Brooks and children as onlookers, they gave it a “loving re-painting“.

Anny Fyreagle Lutia Lausane is the current guardian of the High Park Labyrinth.

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  • Land Acknowledgements

    Traditional: recognizes lands traditionally used and/or occupied by the People or First Nations in parts of the country.

    Ancestral: recognizes land that is handed down from generation to generation.

    Unceded: refers to land that was not turned over to the Crown (government) by a treaty or other agreement.

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  • Metro Vancouver

    Labyrinths are made on the traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of the Coast Salish peoples –

    Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish),

    Stó:lō and

    Səl̓ílwətaʔ/Selilwitulh (Tsleil-Waututh)

    and xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) Nations.

    Labyrinths are made in traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of

    the Kwantlen,

    the Katzie,

    the Semiahmoo

    and Tsawwassen First Nations.