« “Into the Labyrinth 🍥 I appreciate you trying to teach me how to create some of your Labyrinths and some of its algorithms, and for giving me tips on how to pose for the camera! Thanks again HiMY 😝” – Kenji – Yaletown Chalk Labyrinth – Bill Curtis Square – Downtown Vancouver

Yaletown Chalk Labyrinth – Downtown Vancouver – instagram com p Bkb9liCFThs

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  • Human Calendar

  • Land Acknowledgements

    Traditional: recognizes lands traditionally used and/or occupied by the People or First Nations in parts of the country.

    Ancestral: recognizes land that is handed down from generation to generation.

    Unceded: refers to land that was not turned over to the Crown (government) by a treaty or other agreement.

  • Tsí Tkaròn:to

  • Vancouver

    Labyrinths are made on the traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of the Coast Salish peoples –

    Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish),

    Stó:lō and

    Səl̓ílwətaʔ/Selilwitulh (Tsleil-Waututh)

    and xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) Nations.

    Labyrinths are made in traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of

    the Kwantlen,

    the Katzie,

    the Semiahmoo

    and Tsawwassen First Nations.