Monthly Archives: January 2021

January’s End – Vancouver Public Labyrinth – False Creek Seawall

End of January 2021, At the Vancouver Public Labyrinth . . . View this post on Instagram A post shared by Manj Bains (@manjbainsphotography)

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“Городские пейзажи Ванкувера в воскресенье 😍” – Labyrinth Pier – Granville Island – False Creek Seawall – Vancouver

My painted Orange Labyrinth is fading, Yet remains visible, walkable, explorable, enjoyable by these two young Vancouverites . . . View this post on Instagram A post shared by Sonja Lytkin (@maggie_sonja)

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“Dino Sunday Series 🦖🦕” – Octagon Labyrinth – Wading Pool – Budapest Park – Sunnyside Boardwalk – Toronto

“Dino Sunday Series 🦖🦕 Fun fact: The Triceratops had a hard, parrotlike beak. One of the lesser-known facts about dinosaurs such as Triceratops is that they had birdlike beaks and could clip off hundreds of pounds of tough vegetation (including cycads, ginkgoes, and conifers) every day. They also had “batteries” of shearing teeth embedded in […]

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“Are we walking in a vicious circle or moving forward in 2021?” – Labyrinth – Mouth of the Humber River – Humber Bay Arch Bridge – Toronto

Question of the year, for the year . . . View this post on Instagram A post shared by Daniel Wong (@ntrance)

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“Labyrinth walk” – Mouth of the Humber River – Humber Bay Arch Bridge – Toronto

Dusting of snow makes my Labyrinth look half-moon-like . . . View this post on Instagram A post shared by shawn's photos (@shawn.squires)

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January 4 – Vancouver Public Labyrinth – False Creek Seawall

January 4 at The Vancouver Public Labyrinth . . . View this post on Instagram A post shared by André Roizman (@a.roizman)

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“Last snowman standing” – Octagon Labyrinth – Wading Pool – Budapest Park – Sunnyside Boardwalk – Toronto

Mazes have monsters and minotaurs, Labyrinths have… Snowmen ! View this post on Instagram A post shared by Inese Mezulis-Purvs (@inese.mp)

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  • Human Calendar

  • Land Acknowledgements

    Traditional: recognizes lands traditionally used and/or occupied by the People or First Nations in parts of the country.

    Ancestral: recognizes land that is handed down from generation to generation.

    Unceded: refers to land that was not turned over to the Crown (government) by a treaty or other agreement.

  • Tsí Tkaròn:to

  • Vancouver

    Labyrinths are made on the traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of the Coast Salish peoples –

    Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish),

    Stó:lō and

    Səl̓ílwətaʔ/Selilwitulh (Tsleil-Waututh)

    and xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) Nations.

    Labyrinths are made in traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of

    the Kwantlen,

    the Katzie,

    the Semiahmoo

    and Tsawwassen First Nations.