Chalk Labyrinths – Central Playground – Chinguacousy Park – Brampton

Saturday Afternoon spent chalking three Labyrinths in and around the Central Playground of Brampton’s Chinguacousy Park.

I was so focused on making the Labyrinths,

I only took a few photographs.

And altogether forgot to take any photographs of my third Labyrinth, a pass-through baltic design closer to the spray pad area.

It was that time of day,

Before the photographer’s Golden Hour when natural lighting is at its best for image captures,

When long shadows make it challenging to properly photograph the Labyrinths I draw in chalk on the ground.

So I only took two more less than satisfactory photographs to simply remember and remind myself of the day.

People walking the Labyrinths came in waves, when one would walk, many then followed.

Perhaps as many teens and grown-ups walked them as the total number of children who kept returning to re-walk them.

I lost track of time and was mostly in the moment.

Making Labyrinths has become my Mindfulness practice as much as walking Labyrinths.

Around the largest of the afternoon’s three Labyrinths,

I chalked the word for Labyrinths in a number of Brampton’s most spoken Languages.

Somehow the late afternoon rays of sunlight peeking through the trees and landing upon my multi-colour chalk Labyrinth,

Looks very much like the colours of sunlight passing through the stained glass windows of Grace Cathedral in San Francisco, as it illuminated the Labyrinth inside the Church.

Image I took of the Labyrinth inside Grace Cathedral in SF back in 2013.

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  • Human Calendar


  • Land Acknowledgements

    Traditional: recognizes lands traditionally used and/or occupied by the People or First Nations in parts of the country.

    Ancestral: recognizes land that is handed down from generation to generation.

    Unceded: refers to land that was not turned over to the Crown (government) by a treaty or other agreement.

  • Tsí Tkaròn:to

  • Metro Vancouver

    Labyrinths are made on the traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of the Coast Salish peoples –

    Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish),

    Stó:lō and

    Səl̓ílwətaʔ/Selilwitulh (Tsleil-Waututh)

    and xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) Nations.

    Labyrinths are made in traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of

    the Kwantlen,

    the Katzie,

    the Semiahmoo

    and Tsawwassen First Nations.