“Do you know what to do with Labyrinths? My dear friend asks…” — Alyssa | Toronto and Beyond

[Matt] "Do you know what to do with #labyrinths?" my dear friend asks. "Ya, of course," I respond, "make your way through the maze as fast as you can." "That's what I used to think too, but it's actually the opposite. You need to first ask yourself a question before you start. Then you think about the answer to that question as you make your way through; carefully, thoughtfully, patiently." We walk through the labyrinth together carefully, talking about life thoughtfully, and appreciating our surroundings patiently. As we reach the middle, I thank him for his wisdom and friendship and am excited to hear what his question was. "So, what did you ask yourself?" "Oh…I don't even remember anymore. But that was fun, eh?" #friendship #riverdalepark #toronto

A photo posted by Alyssa | Toronto and Beyond (@errdaypeople) on

[Matt] “Do you know what to do with #Labyrinths?” my dear friend asks.

“Ya, of course,” I respond,

“make your way through the maze as fast as you can.”

“That’s what I used to think too, but it’s actually the opposite. You need to first ask yourself a question before you start. Then you think about the answer to that question as you make your way through; carefully, thoughtfully, patiently.”

We walk through the labyrinth together carefully, talking about life thoughtfully, and appreciating our surroundings patiently.

As we reach the middle, I thank him for his wisdom and friendship and am excited to hear what his question was.

“So, what did you ask yourself?”

“Oh…I don’t even remember anymore. But that was fun, eh?”

Alyssa | Toronto and Beyond

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  • Land Acknowledgements

    Traditional: recognizes lands traditionally used and/or occupied by the People or First Nations in parts of the country.

    Ancestral: recognizes land that is handed down from generation to generation.

    Unceded: refers to land that was not turned over to the Crown (government) by a treaty or other agreement.

  • Tsí Tkaròn:to

  • Vancouver

    Labyrinths are made on the traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of the Coast Salish peoples –

    Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish),

    Stó:lō and

    Səl̓ílwətaʔ/Selilwitulh (Tsleil-Waututh)

    and xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) Nations.

    Labyrinths are made in traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of

    the Kwantlen,

    the Katzie,

    the Semiahmoo

    and Tsawwassen First Nations.