JAMDEMIC – “2v2 Open Styles Battle” – Trinity-Bellwoods Park Labyrinth Walk – Downtown Toronto

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Just like a scene from a movie, a group of Toronto teenagers were having a hip hop dance party in the weekend night. They took turn to show off their talent for dance, no TV show jury, no commercial tickets, everyone was a star on the center stage, and everyone gave their admiration and encouragement to each other. #hiphopdance #teenagerlife #subculture #danceinthepark #partyinthepark #trinitybellwoods #pandemic2020 #torontophotographer #torontoartist #torontodailylife #the6ix #ilovecanada #cityscene #citygram #modernlife #streetsoftoronto #streetscenario #dailyphilosphy #streetstyle #lifestyle #streetfashion #streetstory #streetart #natureandhuman #meaningfulphoto #humanbeauty #metaphor #mythoughts #lifeitself #nightisyoung

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“Just like a scene from a movie,

A group of Toronto teenagers were having a hip hop dance party in the weekend night.

They took turn to show off their talent for dance,

No TV show jury,

No commercial tickets,

Everyone was a star on the center stage,

And everyone gave their admiration and encouragement to each other.”

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  • Human Calendar

  • Land Acknowledgements

    Traditional: recognizes lands traditionally used and/or occupied by the People or First Nations in parts of the country.

    Ancestral: recognizes land that is handed down from generation to generation.

    Unceded: refers to land that was not turned over to the Crown (government) by a treaty or other agreement.

  • Tsí Tkaròn:to

  • Vancouver

    Labyrinths are made on the traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of the Coast Salish peoples –

    Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish),

    Stó:lō and

    Səl̓ílwətaʔ/Selilwitulh (Tsleil-Waututh)

    and xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) Nations.

    Labyrinths are made in traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of

    the Kwantlen,

    the Katzie,

    the Semiahmoo

    and Tsawwassen First Nations.