“Supposedly back in the Viking days there were many of these rock mazes by sea shores to trap evil spirits…” – Kirsi Rebekka Halme – Vikingeskibsmuseet i Roskilde, Denmark

“Supposedly back in the Viking days there were many of these rock mazes by sea shores to trap evil spirits.

Here’s how they worked:

A Viking slowly walked in the maze.

His evil spirit followed him in.

The Viking then started speeding up and running and eventually ran out of the maze.

Because bad spirits didn’t move as fast, they were trapped in the maze.

The Viking is then ready to go to sea spirit-free.”

Kirsi Rebekka Halme

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  • Land Acknowledgements

    Traditional: recognizes lands traditionally used and/or occupied by the People or First Nations in parts of the country.

    Ancestral: recognizes land that is handed down from generation to generation.

    Unceded: refers to land that was not turned over to the Crown (government) by a treaty or other agreement.

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  • Vancouver

    Labyrinths are made on the traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of the Coast Salish peoples –

    Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish),

    Stó:lō and

    Səl̓ílwətaʔ/Selilwitulh (Tsleil-Waututh)

    and xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) Nations.

    Labyrinths are made in traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of

    the Kwantlen,

    the Katzie,

    the Semiahmoo

    and Tsawwassen First Nations.