Tag Archives: Woodbine Beach

Labyrinth – Abandoned Wading Pool – Ashbridges Bay Park – Woodbine Beach – Toronto

TOAD. Temporary Obsolete Abandoned Derelict. That’s the current category of Urban Infrastructure for this Wading Pool in Ashbridges Bay Park, Woodbine Beach, East Toronto. It’s no longer a Wading Pool, nor will it the water pump ever be working again. So, I painted a Labyrinth here years ago, and it is still there. Quietly, in […]

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“Found a Labyrinth on my bike ride to the beach today! What a nice surprise.” – Labyrinth – Abandoned Wading Pool – Ashbridges Bay Park – Woodbine Beach – Toronto

Found a #labyrinth on my bike ride to #thebeach today! What a nice #surprise . #citylife #toronto #leslieville #gorillalabyrinths #ashbridgesbaypark #wadingpoollabyrinth A post shared by Janice Turner (@janiceturnerstudio) on Aug 13, 2015 at 11:30am PDT

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“I walk along the beach last night … A man is placing stones, so I ask him about it…” — Alice Murnighan

“I walk along the beach last night, spot a labyrinth I had not noticed before. A man is placing stones, so I ask him about it – fixing it now, been there for months, he creates them all over the city in unexpected locales. He shares his story and his energy, that which i feel […]

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Entropy – Triskelion – Stone Labyrinth – Woodbine Beach Park – East Toronto

Giant Clover Leaf Triple Spiral Triskelion Labyrinth I made from stones earlier this year located at Woodbine Beach in East Toronto is slowly losing cohesion, losing its design, stone by stone, rock by rock, and step by step . . . View this post on Instagram A post shared by Pauline Ramos (@paulineramos) on Jun […]

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“Labyrinth being painted by HiMY SYeD at Woodbine Beach Park” – Greg Burrell – Toronto

#Labyrinth being painted by @HiMYSYeD at Woodbine Beach Park A post shared by Greg Burrell (@ivanvector) on May 20, 2012 at 8:47am PDT Took much longer than planned, however, Woodbine Park now has a colourful Labyrinth! Enjoy! #beachTO http://t.co/jaNxLWke — HïMY SYeD (@HiMYSYeD) 20 May 2012

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“🎵 . . . 🎵” – Triskelion – Stone Labyrinth – Woodbine Beach Park – East Toronto

The outer lanes of one of three stone spirals which make up my Triskelion Labyrinth on Woodbine Beach in East Toronto . . . View this post on Instagram 🎵 Everyone tells me uuh, i need to let go, I knowww. But your cocoa butter skin now has got me beggin' for mooore 🎵 – […]

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“Signs!” – Triskelion – Stone Labyrinth – Woodbine Beach Park – East Toronto

My current Giant Outstallation Art is a Triskelion triple spiral Labyrinth made from stones gathered from all along Woodbine Beach in East Toronto. This image shows two of the three spirals complete, with the third and final spiral begun as seen in the top left . . . View this post on Instagram Signs! A […]

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Sand drawn labyrinth washes away at Woodbine Beach

Today was our first real summer day, heat and humidity wise, yet I hadn’t created any labyrinths on the beach this season. At Woodbine Beach, using a fallen branch as my brush of choice, I drew a three lane, four circuit classic labyrinth.

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  • Human Calendar


  • Land Acknowledgements

    Traditional: recognizes lands traditionally used and/or occupied by the People or First Nations in parts of the country.

    Ancestral: recognizes land that is handed down from generation to generation.

    Unceded: refers to land that was not turned over to the Crown (government) by a treaty or other agreement.

  • Tsí Tkaròn:to

  • Metro Vancouver

    Labyrinths are made on the traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of the Coast Salish peoples –

    Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish),

    Stó:lō and

    Səl̓ílwətaʔ/Selilwitulh (Tsleil-Waututh)

    and xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) Nations.

    Labyrinths are made in traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of

    the Kwantlen,

    the Katzie,

    the Semiahmoo

    and Tsawwassen First Nations.