Last 100 Days Photo Project: Day 48 – Lovers in a dangerous time

By Thom Hamilton, Last 100 Days Photo Project

August 14th 2003 45 million people on the eastern seaboard of North America had their lives go dark. Everyone has a slightly different way to remember that day, I tend to have very fond memories.

Never in my life have I seen community come together like it did that night, neighbors talking on the street, hundreds of people in parks simply laying down looking up at the stars, giving strangers rides home, checking on elders. All of this with out instruction or the use of mass media, it came natural.

Last night there was a small celebration to mark the 5 year anniversary of the date on Ossington Ave.

HiMY SYeD – Toronto City of Labyrinths Project

Sometimes I do wonder how much more we would connect if every once in a while the power did just go out?

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  • Human Calendar

  • Land Acknowledgements

    Traditional: recognizes lands traditionally used and/or occupied by the People or First Nations in parts of the country.

    Ancestral: recognizes land that is handed down from generation to generation.

    Unceded: refers to land that was not turned over to the Crown (government) by a treaty or other agreement.

  • Tsí Tkaròn:to

  • Vancouver

    Labyrinths are made on the traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of the Coast Salish peoples –

    Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish),

    Stó:lō and

    Səl̓ílwətaʔ/Selilwitulh (Tsleil-Waututh)

    and xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) Nations.

    Labyrinths are made in traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of

    the Kwantlen,

    the Katzie,

    the Semiahmoo

    and Tsawwassen First Nations.