“Somebody made a Chartres-style Labyrinth just west of Olympic Village.” – Vancouver Public Labyrinth

Hmmm…. This is not a Chartres Design.

Though labeling it as such is totally understandable.

Most people have never encountered a Labyrinth.

The few people who happen upon Labyrinths usually find the popular Chartres Style 11 or mini Chartres 7 Lane Labyrinth.

Ergo, all Labyrinths look the same when you’ve only ever encountered the same popular design.

I have been considering what to name this different design of mine which was initially inspired by a 650 year old drawing in the marginalia of an Italian Labyrinth Maker’s (?) notebook.

“Still digging” …as the Blogger saying goes.

We’ll properly name this design.

…Eventually.



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  • Human Calendar

  • Land Acknowledgements

    Traditional: recognizes lands traditionally used and/or occupied by the People or First Nations in parts of the country.

    Ancestral: recognizes land that is handed down from generation to generation.

    Unceded: refers to land that was not turned over to the Crown (government) by a treaty or other agreement.

  • Tsí Tkaròn:to

  • Vancouver

    Labyrinths are made on the traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of the Coast Salish peoples –

    Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish),

    Stó:lō and

    Səl̓ílwətaʔ/Selilwitulh (Tsleil-Waututh)

    and xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) Nations.

    Labyrinths are made in traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of

    the Kwantlen,

    the Katzie,

    the Semiahmoo

    and Tsawwassen First Nations.