Tag Archives: TTC

“M. Christie, vous faîtes de bons biscuits 🍪” – Christie Street Traffic Island Labyrinth – Toronto

Look closely upon the Traffic Island in front of Christie Subway Station, and you can make out the Green Labyrinth I painted on it Every day, thousands of people see it, hundreds and hundreds walk over it, and perhaps dozens and dozens of people walk my weirdly located Labyrinth . . . View this post […]

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Yelp Review: Christie Street Traffic Island Labyrinth

We had heard rumors. Walking outside of Christie station on the TTC, we look down… suddenly we see it… artfully laid out on the ground…  The labyrinth. No, this has absolutely nothing to do with David Bowie.

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Prairie Drive Park / Warden Woods Labyrinth as glimpsed through eastbound TTC subway train window

Growing up in Toronto, one invariably will travel the subway system. For years, just east of the Victoria Park station, I would spot this wading pool in the park officially known as Prairie Drive Park but most people think of it as the south end of Warden Woods. I always thought of the many thousands […]

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  • Human Calendar

  • Land Acknowledgements

    Traditional: recognizes lands traditionally used and/or occupied by the People or First Nations in parts of the country.

    Ancestral: recognizes land that is handed down from generation to generation.

    Unceded: refers to land that was not turned over to the Crown (government) by a treaty or other agreement.

  • Tsí Tkaròn:to

  • Vancouver

    Labyrinths are made on the traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of the Coast Salish peoples –

    Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish),

    Stó:lō and

    Səl̓ílwətaʔ/Selilwitulh (Tsleil-Waututh)

    and xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) Nations.

    Labyrinths are made in traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of

    the Kwantlen,

    the Katzie,

    the Semiahmoo

    and Tsawwassen First Nations.