“As usual, the most comprehensive maintenance in Grange Park involves contractors, in a rain storm, power-washing the Labyrinth that’ll be redrawn by the weekend…” – Jonathan Goldsbie – Grange Park Labyrinth – Grange Park – Downtown Toronto


GUIDELINES
INCORPORATE WHIMSY

a. Encourage a sense of joy and playfulness by incorporating whimsy in public art, building design, streetscapes, street furniture and parks and open space features.

b. Design child-friendly elements at a scale that responds to children that provoke the imagination and are fun, interactive, educational, musical and brightly coloured in fantastic sculptural forms.”

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  • Human Calendar


  • Land Acknowledgements

    Traditional: recognizes lands traditionally used and/or occupied by the People or First Nations in parts of the country.

    Ancestral: recognizes land that is handed down from generation to generation.

    Unceded: refers to land that was not turned over to the Crown (government) by a treaty or other agreement.

  • Tsí Tkaròn:to

  • Metro Vancouver

    Labyrinths are made on the traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of the Coast Salish peoples –

    Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish),

    Stó:lō and

    Səl̓ílwətaʔ/Selilwitulh (Tsleil-Waututh)

    and xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) Nations.

    Labyrinths are made in traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of

    the Kwantlen,

    the Katzie,

    the Semiahmoo

    and Tsawwassen First Nations.